ramadan readathon tbr

Another month, another diverse readathon! I clearly just cannot be stopped. Created by Zoya @ We Are All Critics and Nadia @ Words Beneath the Wings, the Ramadan Readathon will be taking place from the 1st to the 30th of June. You can read the full instructions here.

I am really excited to take part in this readathon. Last month I read a couple of books about different religions – Stained (Islam) and In the Shadow of the Banyan (Buddhism) and I want to continue to gather knowledge and stories about Islam in particular. So, without further ado, here is my TBR!

Haldol and Hyacinths

Melody Moezzi was born to Persian parents at the height of the Islamic Revolution and raised amid a vibrant, loving, and gossipy Iranian diaspora in the American heartland.  When at eighteen, she began battling a severe physical illness, her community stepped up, filling her hospital rooms with roses, lilies, and hyacinths.

But when she attempted suicide and was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, there were no flowers. Despite several stays in psychiatric hospitals, bombarded with tranquilizers, mood-stabilizers, and antipsychotics, she was encouraged to keep her illness a secret—by both her family and an increasingly callous and indifferent medical establishment. Refusing to be ashamed, Moezzi became an outspoken advocate, determined to fight the stigma surrounding mental illness and reclaim her life along the way.

Both an irreverent memoir and a rousing call to action, Haldol and Hyacinths is the moving story of a woman who refused to become torn across cultural and social lines. Moezzi reports from the front lines of the no-man’s land between sickness and sanity, and the Midwest and the Middle East. A powerful, funny, and poignant narrative told through a unique and fascinating cultural lens, Haldol and Hyacinths is a tribute to the healing power of hope, humor, and acceptance.

The Things I Would Tell You: British Muslim Women Write

From established literary heavyweights to emerging spoken word artists, the writers in this ground-breaking collection blow away the narrow image of the ‘Muslim Woman’.

Hear from users of Islamic Tinder, a disenchanted Maulana working as a TV chat show host and a plastic surgeon blackmailed by MI6. Follow the career of an actress with Middle-Eastern heritage whose dreams of playing a ghostbuster spiral into repeat castings as a jihadi bride. Among stories of honour killings and ill-fated love in besieged locations, we also find heart-warming connections and powerful challenges to the status quo.

From Algiers to Brighton, these stories transcend time and place revealing just how varied the search for belonging can be.

The Other Half of Happiness

Sofia Khan is just married. But no-one told her life was going to be this way . . .

Her living situation is in dire straits, her husband Conall is distant, and his annoyingly attractive colleague is ringing all sorts of alarm bells.

When her mother forces them into a belated wedding ceremony (elopement: you can run, but you can’t hide), Sofia wonders if it might be a chance to bring them together. But when it forces Conall to confess his darkest secret, it might just tear them apart.

Fire Boy

From Sami Shah comes Fire Boy, the first of a two-part urban fantasy set in modern-day Pakistan, where djinns roam the street alongside corrupt cops, hustling beggars, and creatures from the darkest corners of Islamic mythology.

Growing up in Karachi isn’t easy. Wahid has a lot on his mind: the girl he likes, mostly, but also choosing a good university and finding time to play Dungeons and Dragons. Oh, and the fact that he can see djinns, other-worldly creatures made of a smokeless and scorching fire. After a horrific car accident kills his best friend and djinns steal his girlfriend’s soul, Wahid vows to find out why. Fortunately, he has help in finding the djinns that tried to kill him. Unfortunately, that help is from the darkest of all spirits, the Devil himself …

I may read a couple more if I have the time, or if I see something (relatively) cheap on Kindle. Please give me your recommendations if you’ve read anything fantastic by a Muslim author. Also, if you’re stuck for recommendations, check out #MuslimShelfSpace for some inspiration!

This is such a fantastic idea, and I absolutely cannot wait to see everyone else’s TBRs and reviews!

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6 thoughts on “ramadan readathon tbr

  1. Bina says:

    Yess excellent tbr😍 I’m planning to read Fire Boy also and maybe the first Sofia Khan book, but haven’t settled on a list yet. Mit that I keep to it😁🙈 Love the sound of British Muslim Women btw, need to look for it when it comes out. Happy readathoning!

    Like

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